Below are writing tips I have found useful in developing my trade-craft as an author. I will be adding to these as I discover new ones.

 

Here are some techniques that can help you on your way.

  • How to Write a Book Now: How to Write a Novel is the first series of articles I read on story structure.

    • “We will introduce you to some of the most powerful secrets to novel writing we’ve been able to find and discover to date. They will help you create a well structured and emotionally compelling novel without relying on clichéd formulas.”
  • How to Write Well talks about how to write a useful outline.

    • “The final stage of preparation – writing an outline for your novel – builds on everything you have done so far.”
  • Write Like Rowling Blog is a wonderful blog which really analizes the tradecraft used by Rowling.

    • “I started Write Like Rowling with the goal of helping writers create original and authentic work by studying the mechanics of successful storytelling. “
  • The Better Novel Project Blog deconstructs best sellers to look for common elements in the story structure.

    • “Better Novel Project is all about deconstructing bestsellers, discovering what elements they have in common, and using those elements to create a versatile story structure. We believe research is more effective when it is fun, so each post is hand-illustrated with a doodle or infographic.”
  • National Novel Writing Month (Nanowrimo) (November) and Nanowrimo camp (April, July) are valuable communities for the novelist. There is support and encouragement to be found among them.
  • Writer’s Digest has something about almost everything in which an author might have interest.

    • “Write Better, Get Published” is a wonderful article on getting published.
    • There is a ton of information here!

 

Tools can make the job easier.

 

 A quick checklist for self publishing

For traditional publishing, finding an agent is vital!

 

  • Do your research. I have found that taking classes to improve your writing can connect you with agents. I have been introduced to several agents this way. It also helps you get a feel for the personality of an agent. It will help you decide if you want to build a relationship with that person or if it isn’t a good fit.
  • #MSWL is a hashtag on Twitter that stands for Manuscript Wish List. It’s used by both agents and publishers to let people know what is on a given agent’s manuscript wish list. This is one of the best writing tips I have discovered.

    • MS Wish List is a great site to check out for potential agents and their wishlists.
    • Bent on Books has wishlists for the agents of the Bent Agency and their February 2016 included Heather Flaherty’s wish for “Really dark, twisted, possibly magical, YA”.
    • Here are some agents I found as of 1/15/16 by querying on #MSWL YA Fantasy or from newsletters I receive. They offer writing tips and insight into what they want to see in manuscripts.
  • Writer’s Digest Guide to Literary Agents is a useful place to explore information about finding agents.
  • Query Tracker helps authors find agents. While it does not tell you much about the strengths of various literary agencies, it does tell you about the response rates of agents to queries, and for which genres each agent accepts queries.
  • I have also found that agents are much more available to authors when the writer has taken classes from the agent. Try looking for classes on udemy.com and Writers Digest.

 

Fantasy-specific writing tips can offer some unique insights.

 

More writing articles can be found on my Writer’s Corner board on Pinterest, and my Writer’s Support collection on Google+.

If you need to laugh at yourself as a writer, check out my Writer Memes on Pinterest, or check out heralds for writing news such as conferences and competitions.

 

 


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